Retrieving Teaching: Critical issues in Curriculum, Pedagogy and Learning 1e - Chapter 2 - The concept of teaching

- Critical Issues in Curriculum, Pedagogy and Learning


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    Edition: First
  • Format: eChapter
  • ISBN: 9780702196928-002
  • Language(s): English
  • Extent: 176
  • Published:
  • Category: Education

R41.36



The emerging consensus is that the education system in South Africa is in crisis. Understanding how this happened is crucial to finding a way in which all South Africans, especially the poorest of the poor, can have meaningful access to quality schooling and improving the professional practice of teaching in South Africa.   Retrieving teaching engages critically with some of the dominant conceptions of teaching that have given rise to the crisis, and evaluates the enabling conditions for a viable practice. The book is written in honour of Wally Morrow and as a dialogue with his project around the learning and teaching in post-apartheid South Africa. A substantial part of Wally Morrow’s work – in papers and chapters, working groups and advisory committees – has been devoted to retrieving the primacy of the practice of professional teaching in our thinking about the transformation of schooling and education. Together, the chapters in this volume advance the project of retrieval, hence its title, Retrieving teaching.   It is in this spirit that the contributors to this volume engage in a critical debate with Morrow’s ideas and arguments. The authors have committed themselves to Morrow’s insistence that critique of knowledge claims, premises, reasoning, evidence and conclusions are the very grounds of critical thinking, rational argument and debate. Each chapter takes up an idea from Morrow’s framework of thinking and explains, extends or criticises it. Several of the chapters were first presented, in earlier versions, as part of the Symposium on Learning to Teach in South Africa at the Kenton Conference (Kenton at P[h]umula Olwandlein) – an event in which lively critical debate at times stretched the principle of charity to its limits.     While South Africa is the context and focus of this volume, the issues it addresses – curriculum, pedagogy and learning - are perennials in the field of teaching, teacher education and curriculum in many parts of the world.

  • Introduction (Yael Shalem and Shirley Pendlebury)
    Part 1: Bedrock Ideas in Morrow’s Project
    Chapter One: The eupraxis of Wally Morrow (Wayne Hugo)
    Chapter Two:  The concept of teaching (Yael Shalem and Lynne Slonimsky)
  • Part 2: Retrieving Teaching for Systematic Learning
    Chapter Three: Outcomes-based education: understanding what went wrong (Stephanie Matseleng Allais)
    Chapter Four: Reclaiming the authority of the teacher (Lynne Slonimsky)
    Chapter Five: The A, B and Z of education (David Bensusan)
    Chapter Six: Time for hedgehogs as well as foxes: some temporal aspects of epistemological access to basic education (Shirley Pendlebury)
    Chapter Seven: Scripture and practices: a reply to Wally Morrow (Lesley Le Grange)
    Chapter Eight: How does the form of curriculum affect systematic learning? (Yael Shalem)
  • Part 3: Epistemological Access and Teacher Education
    Chapter Nine: Epistemological access as an open question in education (Heila Lotz-Sisitka)
    Chapter Ten: Seeking substance in student teaching (Lee Rusznyak)
  • Part 4: A Defense of the Politics of Difference
    Chapter Eleven:
    On the possibility of multicultural education through a politics of difference: A response to Wally Morrow (Yusef Waghid)
    Index
    References

  • Education students (undergraduates and postgraduates)
  • Teacher educators and academics
  • Education managers
  • Teachers and principals
  • Curriculum developers
  • Researchers and policy makers

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The emerging consensus is that the education system in South Africa is in crisis. Understanding how this happened is crucial to finding a way in which all South Africans, especially the poorest of the poor, can have meaningful access to quality schooling and improving the professional practice of teaching in South Africa.   Retrieving teaching engages critically with some of the dominant conceptions of teaching that have given rise to the crisis, and evaluates the enabling conditions for a viable practice. The book is written in honour of Wally Morrow and as a dialogue with his project around the learning and teaching in post-apartheid South Africa. A substantial part of Wally Morrow’s work – in papers and chapters, working groups and advisory committees – has been devoted to retrieving the primacy of the practice of professional teaching in our thinking about the transformation of schooling and education. Together, the chapters in this volume advance the project of retrieval, hence its title, Retrieving teaching.   It is in this spirit that the contributors to this volume engage in a critical debate with Morrow’s ideas and arguments. The authors have committed themselves to Morrow’s insistence that critique of knowledge claims, premises, reasoning, evidence and conclusions are the very grounds of critical thinking, rational argument and debate. Each chapter takes up an idea from Morrow’s framework of thinking and explains, extends or criticises it. Several of the chapters were first presented, in earlier versions, as part of the Symposium on Learning to Teach in South Africa at the Kenton Conference (Kenton at P[h]umula Olwandlein) – an event in which lively critical debate at times stretched the principle of charity to its limits.     While South Africa is the context and focus of this volume, the issues it addresses – curriculum, pedagogy and learning - are perennials in the field of teaching, teacher education and curriculum in many parts of the world.

  • Introduction (Yael Shalem and Shirley Pendlebury)
    Part 1: Bedrock Ideas in Morrow’s Project
    Chapter One: The eupraxis of Wally Morrow (Wayne Hugo)
    Chapter Two:  The concept of teaching (Yael Shalem and Lynne Slonimsky)
  • Part 2: Retrieving Teaching for Systematic Learning
    Chapter Three: Outcomes-based education: understanding what went wrong (Stephanie Matseleng Allais)
    Chapter Four: Reclaiming the authority of the teacher (Lynne Slonimsky)
    Chapter Five: The A, B and Z of education (David Bensusan)
    Chapter Six: Time for hedgehogs as well as foxes: some temporal aspects of epistemological access to basic education (Shirley Pendlebury)
    Chapter Seven: Scripture and practices: a reply to Wally Morrow (Lesley Le Grange)
    Chapter Eight: How does the form of curriculum affect systematic learning? (Yael Shalem)
  • Part 3: Epistemological Access and Teacher Education
    Chapter Nine: Epistemological access as an open question in education (Heila Lotz-Sisitka)
    Chapter Ten: Seeking substance in student teaching (Lee Rusznyak)
  • Part 4: A Defense of the Politics of Difference
    Chapter Eleven:
    On the possibility of multicultural education through a politics of difference: A response to Wally Morrow (Yusef Waghid)
    Index
    References

  • Education students (undergraduates and postgraduates)
  • Teacher educators and academics
  • Education managers
  • Teachers and principals
  • Curriculum developers
  • Researchers and policy makers

This product does not have any reviews yet - be the first to write one.


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