Performing Indigeneity

Spectacles of Culture and Identity in Coloniality


Available
    Edition: 1st Edition
  • Format: Soft Cover
  • ISBN: 9781775822806
  • Extent: 205 Pages
  • Published:
  • Category: UCT Press, Anthropology, Development Studies, Social Sciences

R305.00



Formerly colonised people sometimes play roles that sustain the power structure of coloniality. In this book, Professor Morgan Ndlovu asks why and how they can possibly participate in a system that is responsible for their subjugation. The author uses as an example the ‘staged’ performances of non-Western culture in South Africa, such as traditional healing, and the creation of ‘cultural villages’, which while seeming to define and keep alive elements of an African culture also serve the business of international and cultural tourism. He compares practices in South Africa with parallels in India, Australia, Canada, other parts of Africa and the Americas.

He argues that it is not just brute force that made the survival and continuity of coloniality possible up to the present but also the control of knowledge that justified and naturalised the colonial project. Performing Indigeneity provides an insightful evaluation of what could constitute an ‘authentic’ indigenous agency and the pitfalls and prospects of decolonial practices.

  • CHAPTER 1: Introduction: Why Performing Indigeneity Matters 
  • CHAPTER 2: Decolonising the Drama-Stage Conundrum 
  • CHAPTER 3: The Invasion of African Culture 
  • CHAPTER 4: Being and Becoming Zulu in Modern/Colonial South Africa 
  • CHAPTER 5: The Idea of Cultural Villages in South Africa 
  • CHAPTER 6. The Crisis of Indigenous Agency in Cultural Villages 
  • CHAPTER 7: Being and Becoming a Traditional Healer in Modern South Africa 
  • CHAPTER 8: Performing Indigeneity: A Global Perspective 
  • Appendix: List of Cultural Villages in South Africa 

Academics, activists, communities, social movements, students and radical thinkers in disciplines such as, but not limited to, Philosophy, Politics, Literary Studies, Social Anthropology, History, Sociology, African Studies, Postcolonial Studies and Decolonial Studies.

This product does not have any reviews yet - be the first to write one.

Formerly colonised people sometimes play roles that sustain the power structure of coloniality. In this book, Professor Morgan Ndlovu asks why and how they can possibly participate in a system that is responsible for their subjugation. The author uses as an example the ‘staged’ performances of non-Western culture in South Africa, such as traditional healing, and the creation of ‘cultural villages’, which while seeming to define and keep alive elements of an African culture also serve the business of international and cultural tourism. He compares practices in South Africa with parallels in India, Australia, Canada, other parts of Africa and the Americas.

He argues that it is not just brute force that made the survival and continuity of coloniality possible up to the present but also the control of knowledge that justified and naturalised the colonial project. Performing Indigeneity provides an insightful evaluation of what could constitute an ‘authentic’ indigenous agency and the pitfalls and prospects of decolonial practices.

  • CHAPTER 1: Introduction: Why Performing Indigeneity Matters 
  • CHAPTER 2: Decolonising the Drama-Stage Conundrum 
  • CHAPTER 3: The Invasion of African Culture 
  • CHAPTER 4: Being and Becoming Zulu in Modern/Colonial South Africa 
  • CHAPTER 5: The Idea of Cultural Villages in South Africa 
  • CHAPTER 6. The Crisis of Indigenous Agency in Cultural Villages 
  • CHAPTER 7: Being and Becoming a Traditional Healer in Modern South Africa 
  • CHAPTER 8: Performing Indigeneity: A Global Perspective 
  • Appendix: List of Cultural Villages in South Africa 

Academics, activists, communities, social movements, students and radical thinkers in disciplines such as, but not limited to, Philosophy, Politics, Literary Studies, Social Anthropology, History, Sociology, African Studies, Postcolonial Studies and Decolonial Studies.

This product does not have any reviews yet - be the first to write one.