Introduction to Communication Studies, An (ePub)

This edition is for use by UNISA students only


Available
    Edition: 1st edition
  • Format: eBook
  • ISBN: 9780702196621
  • Language(s): English
  • Extent: 352 pages
  • Published:
  • Category: Communication

R540.00



The primary purpose of this text book is to provide a sound foundation in communication theory for undergraduate students at tertiary institutions in South Africa against the background of outcomes-based education. To achieve the learning outcomes related to knowledge, skills, competencies, and attitudes and/or experiences, the book combines the theory and practice of communication. Students are often puzzled by the need for a strong theoretical foundation in a subject as practical as communication.

It is only with hindsight that they realise that the practice of communication is made more efficient by an understanding of the underlying theory. The approach in this book is first to provide knowledge and understanding of communication as a science, and then to relate this knowledge to their everyday experiences.

The intention is to motivate students to learn about communication and to become actively involved in developing their personal and professional communication competence.

Chapter 1 – A brief history of communication
1.1 The stages of human communication

Chapter 2 – The functions of communication
2.1 Purposes of communication
2.2 Effects of communication
2.3 Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
2.4 Packard’s theory of needs
2.5 Communication as a scientific discipline
2.6 Communication competence

Chapter 3 – The communication process
3.1 Defining communication
3.2 Dimensions of communication
3.3 Components of the communication process
3.4 Models of the communication process
3.5 More advanced communication theories
3.6 Contextual approaches to communication

Chapter 4 – Perception, listening and feedback
4.1 Perception
4.2 Listening
4.3 Listening and feedback

Chapter 5 – Nonverbal communication
5.1 Functions of nonverbal communication
5.2 Aspects of nonverbal communication
5.3 Categories of nonverbal communication
5.4 Nonverbal skills

Chapter 6 – Language and communication
6.1 Orwell’s views on language
6.2 Uses of language
6.3 The functions of language
6.4 Language as a system of signs
6.5 Causes of misunderstanding
6.6 Genderlects
6.7 Sapir-Whorf hypothesis
6.8 Improving language skills
Part 2: Contexts of Communication Study

Chapter 7 – Intrapersonal communication
7.1 The self
7.2 Self-concept
7.3 Intrapersonal variables
7.4 Cultural and gender differences
7.5 Perception of others
7.6 Improving the accuracy of your perceptions

Chapter 8 – Interpersonal communication
8.1 Buber’s theory of interpersonal relationships
8.2 Stages in the development of interpersonal relationships
8.3 Interpersonal communication and self-disclosure
8.4 Interpersonal communication and needs
8.5 Interpersonal communication and assertiveness
8.6 The presentation of self in everyday life
8.7 Presentation skills

Chapter 9 – Small group communication
9.1 Defining a group
9.2 Advantages and disadvantages of small groups
9.3 Group characteristics
9.4 Communication networks in small groups
9.5 Leadership in groups
9.6 Discussion in groups
9.7 Group conflict
9.8 Differences between interpersonal and group
communication

Chapter 10 – Public speaking
10.1 Determining the purpose of your talk
10.2 Analysing the audience
10.3 Selecting a topic
10.4 Researching the topic
10.5 Writing the talk
10.6 Organisational techniques for specific purposes
10.7 Preparing the delivery
10.8 Visuals
10.9 Evaluating speeches

Beginner students majoring in Communication Studies, as well as those studying towards various degrees or qualifications where communications is a prerequisite, will find this book useful.

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The primary purpose of this text book is to provide a sound foundation in communication theory for undergraduate students at tertiary institutions in South Africa against the background of outcomes-based education. To achieve the learning outcomes related to knowledge, skills, competencies, and attitudes and/or experiences, the book combines the theory and practice of communication. Students are often puzzled by the need for a strong theoretical foundation in a subject as practical as communication.

It is only with hindsight that they realise that the practice of communication is made more efficient by an understanding of the underlying theory. The approach in this book is first to provide knowledge and understanding of communication as a science, and then to relate this knowledge to their everyday experiences.

The intention is to motivate students to learn about communication and to become actively involved in developing their personal and professional communication competence.

Chapter 1 – A brief history of communication
1.1 The stages of human communication

Chapter 2 – The functions of communication
2.1 Purposes of communication
2.2 Effects of communication
2.3 Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
2.4 Packard’s theory of needs
2.5 Communication as a scientific discipline
2.6 Communication competence

Chapter 3 – The communication process
3.1 Defining communication
3.2 Dimensions of communication
3.3 Components of the communication process
3.4 Models of the communication process
3.5 More advanced communication theories
3.6 Contextual approaches to communication

Chapter 4 – Perception, listening and feedback
4.1 Perception
4.2 Listening
4.3 Listening and feedback

Chapter 5 – Nonverbal communication
5.1 Functions of nonverbal communication
5.2 Aspects of nonverbal communication
5.3 Categories of nonverbal communication
5.4 Nonverbal skills

Chapter 6 – Language and communication
6.1 Orwell’s views on language
6.2 Uses of language
6.3 The functions of language
6.4 Language as a system of signs
6.5 Causes of misunderstanding
6.6 Genderlects
6.7 Sapir-Whorf hypothesis
6.8 Improving language skills
Part 2: Contexts of Communication Study

Chapter 7 – Intrapersonal communication
7.1 The self
7.2 Self-concept
7.3 Intrapersonal variables
7.4 Cultural and gender differences
7.5 Perception of others
7.6 Improving the accuracy of your perceptions

Chapter 8 – Interpersonal communication
8.1 Buber’s theory of interpersonal relationships
8.2 Stages in the development of interpersonal relationships
8.3 Interpersonal communication and self-disclosure
8.4 Interpersonal communication and needs
8.5 Interpersonal communication and assertiveness
8.6 The presentation of self in everyday life
8.7 Presentation skills

Chapter 9 – Small group communication
9.1 Defining a group
9.2 Advantages and disadvantages of small groups
9.3 Group characteristics
9.4 Communication networks in small groups
9.5 Leadership in groups
9.6 Discussion in groups
9.7 Group conflict
9.8 Differences between interpersonal and group
communication

Chapter 10 – Public speaking
10.1 Determining the purpose of your talk
10.2 Analysing the audience
10.3 Selecting a topic
10.4 Researching the topic
10.5 Writing the talk
10.6 Organisational techniques for specific purposes
10.7 Preparing the delivery
10.8 Visuals
10.9 Evaluating speeches

Beginner students majoring in Communication Studies, as well as those studying towards various degrees or qualifications where communications is a prerequisite, will find this book useful.

This product does not have any reviews yet - be the first to write one.