Communication and Media Ethics 1e (WebPDF)

In South Africa



    Edition: 1st edition
  • Format: eBook
  • ISBN: 9780702196492
  • Language(s): English
  • Extent: 352 pages
  • Published:
  • Category: Communication

R528.00

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Ethics in the media is a topic of some heated discussion right now in South Africa and is clearly a challenge to practitioners as well as students of communication and media studies. Communication and Media Ethics in South Africa introduces and grapples with notions of ethical principles and practices, and how these may be applied in a diverse and challenging local context that is still undergoing political and policy transformation. This timely book is has been written by reputable South African academics in the field.

Chapter 1: Whose ethics are they, anyway?
Chapter 2: Normative media theory in a changed media landscape and globalised society
Chapter 3: Between prodceduralism and substantialism in communication ethics
Chapter 4: Afri(Ethics), communitarianism and the public sphere
Chapter 5: Southern African press councils: accountability in practice
Chapter 6: Press councils and the democratic landscape in SA
Chapter 7: Analysing ethics and political bias in South African news media
Chapter 8: When the public interest is not what interests the public: An investigation of privacy as media ethic in contemporary SA
Chapter 9: Chequebook journalism: A SA picture
Chapter 10: Ethics in business journalism
Chapter 11: Ethical corporate communication cultures within brand environments
Chapter 12: Ethics and the need to understand culture
Chapter 13: Reporting HIV/AIDS: An unprecedented ethical challenge
Chapter 14: Contesting the electricity supply in SA Media

Communication and Media Ethics in South Africa is essential reading for all future and current practitioners and researchers in the field of ethics, as it explores the scope and effectiveness of principles and practices across a vast range of issues and topics pertinent to South Africa. Undergraduate students at universities and universities of technology studying communication, media or journalism.

The arguments are presented in three sections:
• The first section introduces the core theories and principles of ethics from a communication and media studies perspective. Predominantly Western and African perspectives are examined in order to determine their relevance in South Africa, and their implications for mass communication and journalism practices. This section also addresses the challenges and concerns presented by online social media.
• The second section looks at the prevalence and effectiveness of self-regulation in the media. There is a robust discussion of the role of the press councils and ombudsmen, both internal and external.
• The final section presents a series of South African case studies around political, economic and social ethical concerns. Contributions include references to political bias, public interest, cheque book journalism, the brand culture, financial news reporting, and media coverage of HIV/AIDS, local cultures and natural energy resources.
To enhance active learning practices, each chapter starts with Key Terms and Concepts. Relevant South African examples are provided to demonstrate the applicability of theoretical frameworks. To assist with the consolidation process, each chapter ends with Topics/Questions for Discussion.

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Ethics in the media is a topic of some heated discussion right now in South Africa and is clearly a challenge to practitioners as well as students of communication and media studies. Communication and Media Ethics in South Africa introduces and grapples with notions of ethical principles and practices, and how these may be applied in a diverse and challenging local context that is still undergoing political and policy transformation. This timely book is has been written by reputable South African academics in the field.

Chapter 1: Whose ethics are they, anyway?
Chapter 2: Normative media theory in a changed media landscape and globalised society
Chapter 3: Between prodceduralism and substantialism in communication ethics
Chapter 4: Afri(Ethics), communitarianism and the public sphere
Chapter 5: Southern African press councils: accountability in practice
Chapter 6: Press councils and the democratic landscape in SA
Chapter 7: Analysing ethics and political bias in South African news media
Chapter 8: When the public interest is not what interests the public: An investigation of privacy as media ethic in contemporary SA
Chapter 9: Chequebook journalism: A SA picture
Chapter 10: Ethics in business journalism
Chapter 11: Ethical corporate communication cultures within brand environments
Chapter 12: Ethics and the need to understand culture
Chapter 13: Reporting HIV/AIDS: An unprecedented ethical challenge
Chapter 14: Contesting the electricity supply in SA Media

Communication and Media Ethics in South Africa is essential reading for all future and current practitioners and researchers in the field of ethics, as it explores the scope and effectiveness of principles and practices across a vast range of issues and topics pertinent to South Africa. Undergraduate students at universities and universities of technology studying communication, media or journalism.

The arguments are presented in three sections:
• The first section introduces the core theories and principles of ethics from a communication and media studies perspective. Predominantly Western and African perspectives are examined in order to determine their relevance in South Africa, and their implications for mass communication and journalism practices. This section also addresses the challenges and concerns presented by online social media.
• The second section looks at the prevalence and effectiveness of self-regulation in the media. There is a robust discussion of the role of the press councils and ombudsmen, both internal and external.
• The final section presents a series of South African case studies around political, economic and social ethical concerns. Contributions include references to political bias, public interest, cheque book journalism, the brand culture, financial news reporting, and media coverage of HIV/AIDS, local cultures and natural energy resources.
To enhance active learning practices, each chapter starts with Key Terms and Concepts. Relevant South African examples are provided to demonstrate the applicability of theoretical frameworks. To assist with the consolidation process, each chapter ends with Topics/Questions for Discussion.

This product does not have any reviews yet - be the first to write one.