Analysis of Safety Incidents 1e WebPDF


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    Edition: 1st edition
  • Format: eBook
  • ISBN: 9781485129394
  • Extent: 371 pages
  • Published:
  • Category: Business Management

R431.00



Workplace incidents and accidents affect businesses long after the incidents occur. The interruption of busi­ness activities and running equipment results in financial loss. Injuries suffered by people damage a business’s image and competitive edge, and demotivate employees. By approaching safety risks in a measured, responsible manner, safety professionals and business owners can mitigate the occurrence of incidents and prevent them from happening in the workplace.

Chapter 1: Safety management and workplace incidents

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Historical development

1.3 Nature of safety hazards

1.4 Characteristics of safety hazards

1.5 The study object of safety management as a science

1.6 Basics of safety risk management

1.7 Hierarchy of controls

1.8 Basic legal safety responsibilities of employers and employees

1.9 Accidents and safety hazards

1.10 Multidisciplinary focus

1.11 Role and importance of safety signs

1.12 Guidelines for emergency preparedness

1.13 Basic philosophical approach

1.14 Conclusion

 

Chapter 2 – Part 1: Safety incident investigation and reporting

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Historical background

2.3 Concepts and terminology

2.4 South African workforce

2.5 Incidents and diseases related to improving safety worldwide

2.6 Safety organisations

2.7 Conclusion 

 

Chapter 2 – Part 2: Safety incident investigation and reporting

2-2.1 Introduction

2-2.2 South African legislation

2-2.3 Occupational diseases and injuries in South Africa

2-2.4 Reporting an occupational injury or disease to the Compensation Commissioner

2-2.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 3 – Part 1: Accident causation theories and loss

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Herbert Heinrich’s domino theory

3.3 Russell Ferrell’s human factors theory

3.4 Dan Petersen’s accident–incident causation theory

3.5 Systems theory

3.6 E Scott Geller’s behaviour-based safety theory

3.7 Combination theory

3.8 Accident causation and management failures

3.9 Accident causation theory related to substance abuse

3.10 Conclusion

 

Chapter 3 – Part 2: Accident causation theories and loss

2-3.1 Introduction

2-3.2 Definitions of an accident

2-3.3 Aspects of an accident

2-3.4 Accident ratio models

2-3.5 Loss caused by accidents

2-3.6 Ethics in safety

2-3.7 Conclusion

 

Chapter 4: Incident prevention, investigation and reporting

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Legal requirements of reporting incidents

4.3 Incident prevention

4.4 Incident investigation

4.5 Incident investigation

4.6 Drafting, developing and presenting an incident report

4.7 Understanding the purpose of an incident report

4.8 Understanding the requirements of an incident report

4.9 Physical structure of an incident report

4.10 Conclusion

 

Chapter 5 – Part 1: Safety and unsafety and challenging current views on safety hazards

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Working backwards

5.3 Safety and unsafety as bases of safety risk

5.4 Harm

5.5 Damage

5.6 Negative environmental impact

5.7 The origins of harm, damage and negative environmental impact

5.8 Conclusion

 

Chapter 5 – Part 2: Safety and unsafety and challenging current views on safety hazards

2-5.1 Introduction

2-5.2 Current perceptions of, or views on, safety hazards

2-5.3 Assessing current views of safety hazards

2-5.4 Contextual assessment of current definitions of a safety hazard

2-5.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 6 – Part 1: Real safety hazards and the characteristics of safety hazards

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Elements of real safety hazards

6.3 Definition of a safety hazard

6.4 Types of safety hazards

6.5 Clarifying the existence of potential safety hazards

6.6 Conclusion 

 

Chapter 6 – Part 2: Real safety hazards and the characteristics of safety hazards

2-6.1 Introduction

2-6.2 Structural characteristics of safety hazards

2-6.3 Functioning characteristics of safety hazards

2-6.4 Conclusion

 

Chapter 7 – Part 1: Safety in a situational context and humans as safety hazards

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Humans as safety hazards

7.3 Structural characteristics of humans as safety hazards

7.4 Functioning characteristics of humans as safety hazards

7.5 Humans function with inconsistency

7.6 Conclusion

 

Chapter 7 – Part 2: Safety in a situational context and humans as safety hazards

2-7.1 Introduction

2-7.2 The elements of being safe

2-7.3 Safety risk in general

2-7.4 Speculative risk

2-7.5 Pure safety risk

2-7.6 Environmental risk

2-7.7 Acceptable safety risk

2-7.8 Tolerable safety risk

2-7.9 Safety as a state

2-7.10 Competence of things involved

2-7.11 Human competence in general

2-7.12 Competence of the environment

2-7.13 Revised definition of safety as a state

2-7.14 Safety and safety risks are bound by the situation

2-7.15 Different levels of acceptable safety risk in one situation

2-7.16 Unacceptable safety risk

2-7.17 Conclusion

 

Chapter 8 – Part 1: The origins of safety risk and safety as a science

8.1 Introduction

8.2 The nature of safety risk in general

8.3 When, where and how safety hazards generate safety risk

8.4 Safety hazard characteristics contribute to safety risk

8.5 Definition of safety risk

8.6 Forms of safety risk

8.7 Common reasons for the inconsistent behaviour (functioning) of humans

8.8 Human error

8.9 Conclusion

 

Chapter 8 – Part 2: The origins of safety risk and safety as a science

2-8.1 Introduction

2-8.2 The science of safety

2-8.3 The science of management

2-8.4 The science of safety management

2-8.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 9 – Part 1: Introduction to safety risks and its origins

– Leonie Louw

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Nature of safety risks

9.3 Identification of safety risks

9.4 Purpose of safety risk assessments

9.5 Types of safety risks

9.6 The relationship between different types of safety risks

9.7 Situational safety risks

9.8 Conclusion 

 

Chapter 9 – Part 2: Introduction to safety risks and its origins

2-9.1 Introduction

2-9.2 Safety hazards and their characteristics

2-9.3 Types of safety hazards

2-9.4 Beginning (origin) of safety risks

2-9.5 Modes of safety hazard interaction

2-9.6 Process of safety hazard interaction

2-9.7 Contribution of safety hazard characteristics to safety risks

2-9.8 Conclusion

 

Chapter 10 – Part 1: Legal requirements, analysis and assessment to safety risks

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Ensuring a safe working environment

10.3 Legislative safety risk directives

10.4 Spectrum of safety risk assessment

10.5 Purpose of safety risk assessment

10.6 Conclusion

 

Chapter 10 – Part 2: Legal requirements, analysis and assessment to safety risks

2-10.1 Introduction

2-10.2 Definition of safety risk assessment

2-10.3 Process of safety risk assessment

2-10.4 Criteria for a safety risk assessment

2-10.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 11 – Part 1: Forms of safety risk and the role of cross functional teams

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Different forms of safety risk assessment

11.3 Contexts of a safety risk assessment

11.4 Scope of a safety risk assessment

11.5 General considerations in a safety risk assessment

11.6 Conclusion

 

Chapter 11 – Part 2: Forms of safety risk and the role of cross functional teams

2-11.1 Introduction

2-11.2 A multidisciplinary approach in safety risk assessment

2-11.3 Selection of a multidisciplinary team

2-11.4 Members of a cross-functional team

2-11.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 12: Evaluating safety risks

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Evaluating safety risks

12.3 Importance of evaluating safety risks

12.4 Process of evaluating safety risks

12.5 Focus of safety risk management

12.6 Responsibility for managing safety risks

12.7 Hierarchy for developing and implementing safety controls

12.8 Conclusion

 

Chapter 13: Report writing on assessing and evaluating safety risks

13.2 Content of the safety risk assessment report

13.3 Purpose of the safety risk assessment report

13.4 Context of the safety risk assessment report

13.5 Plan of the safety risk assessment report

13.6 Scope of the safety risk assessment report

13.7 Procedures of the safety risk assessment report

13.8 Outcomes of the safety risk assessment report

13.9 Compliance with regulatory requirements

13.10 Recommendations of the safety risk assessment report

13.11 People involved in the safety risk assessment report

13.12 Application of the safety risk assessment report

13.13 Presenting the safety risk assessment report

13.14 Conclusion 

 

Chapter 14: Establishing a safety culture

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Elements of a corporate safety culture

14.3 Levels of corporate safety culture

14.4 Characteristics of organisations with a corporate safety culture

14.5 The importance of establishing and maintaining a corporate safety culture

14.6 How to establish a corporate safety culture

14.7 Changing workplace culture

14.8 Barriers to corporate safety culture

14.9 Gaining commitment to a corporate safety culture

14.10 Training personnel in corporate safety culture attitudes and practices

14.11 Cross-functional teams

14.12 Reinforcing safety attitudes with rewards and recognition

14.13 Assessing the safety aspects of an organisation’s corporate safety culture

14.14 Ethics and safety

14.15 Conclusion

 

Chapter 15: Safety management vision statements goals and objectives

15.1 Introduction

15.2 What is a vision and mission statement?

15.3 Safety management goals and objectives

15.4 Safety management policies

15.5 The role of consultation and cross-functional teams

15.6 Conclusion

 

Chapter 16: Quantitative methods and safety data analysis

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Defining data analysis

16.3 Defining quantitative data analysis

16.4 Safety data and decision making

16.5 Advantages of using Quantitative Methods

16.6 The research process

16.7 Gathering data

16.8 Data analysis

16.9 Analysing data ethically

16.10 Types of quantitative techniques

16.11 Pitfalls of data analysis

16.12 Conclusion

Analysis of Safety Incidents draws together the work and expertise of four authors experienced in the field of safety management. It guides readers through the theory of safety management with practical examples and applications as well as a series of self-assessment questions that test the readers’ understanding. Its content is of relevance to safety professionals, managers, business owners and students.

Some of the topics discussed in Analysis of Safety Incidents include:

·         Safety management

·         Safety incident investigation and reporting

·         Accident causation theories and loss

·         Safety and unsafety – challenging current views on safety hazards

·         Real safety hazards and the characteristics of safety hazards

·         Safety in a situational context, and humans as safety hazards

·         Safety as a science

·         Safety risk and its origins

·         Legal requirements

·         The role of cross-functional teams

·         Evaluating safety risks

·         Establishing a safety culture

 

·         Quantitative methods and safety data analysis

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Workplace incidents and accidents affect businesses long after the incidents occur. The interruption of busi­ness activities and running equipment results in financial loss. Injuries suffered by people damage a business’s image and competitive edge, and demotivate employees. By approaching safety risks in a measured, responsible manner, safety professionals and business owners can mitigate the occurrence of incidents and prevent them from happening in the workplace.

Chapter 1: Safety management and workplace incidents

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Historical development

1.3 Nature of safety hazards

1.4 Characteristics of safety hazards

1.5 The study object of safety management as a science

1.6 Basics of safety risk management

1.7 Hierarchy of controls

1.8 Basic legal safety responsibilities of employers and employees

1.9 Accidents and safety hazards

1.10 Multidisciplinary focus

1.11 Role and importance of safety signs

1.12 Guidelines for emergency preparedness

1.13 Basic philosophical approach

1.14 Conclusion

 

Chapter 2 – Part 1: Safety incident investigation and reporting

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Historical background

2.3 Concepts and terminology

2.4 South African workforce

2.5 Incidents and diseases related to improving safety worldwide

2.6 Safety organisations

2.7 Conclusion 

 

Chapter 2 – Part 2: Safety incident investigation and reporting

2-2.1 Introduction

2-2.2 South African legislation

2-2.3 Occupational diseases and injuries in South Africa

2-2.4 Reporting an occupational injury or disease to the Compensation Commissioner

2-2.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 3 – Part 1: Accident causation theories and loss

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Herbert Heinrich’s domino theory

3.3 Russell Ferrell’s human factors theory

3.4 Dan Petersen’s accident–incident causation theory

3.5 Systems theory

3.6 E Scott Geller’s behaviour-based safety theory

3.7 Combination theory

3.8 Accident causation and management failures

3.9 Accident causation theory related to substance abuse

3.10 Conclusion

 

Chapter 3 – Part 2: Accident causation theories and loss

2-3.1 Introduction

2-3.2 Definitions of an accident

2-3.3 Aspects of an accident

2-3.4 Accident ratio models

2-3.5 Loss caused by accidents

2-3.6 Ethics in safety

2-3.7 Conclusion

 

Chapter 4: Incident prevention, investigation and reporting

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Legal requirements of reporting incidents

4.3 Incident prevention

4.4 Incident investigation

4.5 Incident investigation

4.6 Drafting, developing and presenting an incident report

4.7 Understanding the purpose of an incident report

4.8 Understanding the requirements of an incident report

4.9 Physical structure of an incident report

4.10 Conclusion

 

Chapter 5 – Part 1: Safety and unsafety and challenging current views on safety hazards

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Working backwards

5.3 Safety and unsafety as bases of safety risk

5.4 Harm

5.5 Damage

5.6 Negative environmental impact

5.7 The origins of harm, damage and negative environmental impact

5.8 Conclusion

 

Chapter 5 – Part 2: Safety and unsafety and challenging current views on safety hazards

2-5.1 Introduction

2-5.2 Current perceptions of, or views on, safety hazards

2-5.3 Assessing current views of safety hazards

2-5.4 Contextual assessment of current definitions of a safety hazard

2-5.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 6 – Part 1: Real safety hazards and the characteristics of safety hazards

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Elements of real safety hazards

6.3 Definition of a safety hazard

6.4 Types of safety hazards

6.5 Clarifying the existence of potential safety hazards

6.6 Conclusion 

 

Chapter 6 – Part 2: Real safety hazards and the characteristics of safety hazards

2-6.1 Introduction

2-6.2 Structural characteristics of safety hazards

2-6.3 Functioning characteristics of safety hazards

2-6.4 Conclusion

 

Chapter 7 – Part 1: Safety in a situational context and humans as safety hazards

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Humans as safety hazards

7.3 Structural characteristics of humans as safety hazards

7.4 Functioning characteristics of humans as safety hazards

7.5 Humans function with inconsistency

7.6 Conclusion

 

Chapter 7 – Part 2: Safety in a situational context and humans as safety hazards

2-7.1 Introduction

2-7.2 The elements of being safe

2-7.3 Safety risk in general

2-7.4 Speculative risk

2-7.5 Pure safety risk

2-7.6 Environmental risk

2-7.7 Acceptable safety risk

2-7.8 Tolerable safety risk

2-7.9 Safety as a state

2-7.10 Competence of things involved

2-7.11 Human competence in general

2-7.12 Competence of the environment

2-7.13 Revised definition of safety as a state

2-7.14 Safety and safety risks are bound by the situation

2-7.15 Different levels of acceptable safety risk in one situation

2-7.16 Unacceptable safety risk

2-7.17 Conclusion

 

Chapter 8 – Part 1: The origins of safety risk and safety as a science

8.1 Introduction

8.2 The nature of safety risk in general

8.3 When, where and how safety hazards generate safety risk

8.4 Safety hazard characteristics contribute to safety risk

8.5 Definition of safety risk

8.6 Forms of safety risk

8.7 Common reasons for the inconsistent behaviour (functioning) of humans

8.8 Human error

8.9 Conclusion

 

Chapter 8 – Part 2: The origins of safety risk and safety as a science

2-8.1 Introduction

2-8.2 The science of safety

2-8.3 The science of management

2-8.4 The science of safety management

2-8.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 9 – Part 1: Introduction to safety risks and its origins

– Leonie Louw

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Nature of safety risks

9.3 Identification of safety risks

9.4 Purpose of safety risk assessments

9.5 Types of safety risks

9.6 The relationship between different types of safety risks

9.7 Situational safety risks

9.8 Conclusion 

 

Chapter 9 – Part 2: Introduction to safety risks and its origins

2-9.1 Introduction

2-9.2 Safety hazards and their characteristics

2-9.3 Types of safety hazards

2-9.4 Beginning (origin) of safety risks

2-9.5 Modes of safety hazard interaction

2-9.6 Process of safety hazard interaction

2-9.7 Contribution of safety hazard characteristics to safety risks

2-9.8 Conclusion

 

Chapter 10 – Part 1: Legal requirements, analysis and assessment to safety risks

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Ensuring a safe working environment

10.3 Legislative safety risk directives

10.4 Spectrum of safety risk assessment

10.5 Purpose of safety risk assessment

10.6 Conclusion

 

Chapter 10 – Part 2: Legal requirements, analysis and assessment to safety risks

2-10.1 Introduction

2-10.2 Definition of safety risk assessment

2-10.3 Process of safety risk assessment

2-10.4 Criteria for a safety risk assessment

2-10.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 11 – Part 1: Forms of safety risk and the role of cross functional teams

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Different forms of safety risk assessment

11.3 Contexts of a safety risk assessment

11.4 Scope of a safety risk assessment

11.5 General considerations in a safety risk assessment

11.6 Conclusion

 

Chapter 11 – Part 2: Forms of safety risk and the role of cross functional teams

2-11.1 Introduction

2-11.2 A multidisciplinary approach in safety risk assessment

2-11.3 Selection of a multidisciplinary team

2-11.4 Members of a cross-functional team

2-11.5 Conclusion

 

Chapter 12: Evaluating safety risks

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Evaluating safety risks

12.3 Importance of evaluating safety risks

12.4 Process of evaluating safety risks

12.5 Focus of safety risk management

12.6 Responsibility for managing safety risks

12.7 Hierarchy for developing and implementing safety controls

12.8 Conclusion

 

Chapter 13: Report writing on assessing and evaluating safety risks

13.2 Content of the safety risk assessment report

13.3 Purpose of the safety risk assessment report

13.4 Context of the safety risk assessment report

13.5 Plan of the safety risk assessment report

13.6 Scope of the safety risk assessment report

13.7 Procedures of the safety risk assessment report

13.8 Outcomes of the safety risk assessment report

13.9 Compliance with regulatory requirements

13.10 Recommendations of the safety risk assessment report

13.11 People involved in the safety risk assessment report

13.12 Application of the safety risk assessment report

13.13 Presenting the safety risk assessment report

13.14 Conclusion 

 

Chapter 14: Establishing a safety culture

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Elements of a corporate safety culture

14.3 Levels of corporate safety culture

14.4 Characteristics of organisations with a corporate safety culture

14.5 The importance of establishing and maintaining a corporate safety culture

14.6 How to establish a corporate safety culture

14.7 Changing workplace culture

14.8 Barriers to corporate safety culture

14.9 Gaining commitment to a corporate safety culture

14.10 Training personnel in corporate safety culture attitudes and practices

14.11 Cross-functional teams

14.12 Reinforcing safety attitudes with rewards and recognition

14.13 Assessing the safety aspects of an organisation’s corporate safety culture

14.14 Ethics and safety

14.15 Conclusion

 

Chapter 15: Safety management vision statements goals and objectives

15.1 Introduction

15.2 What is a vision and mission statement?

15.3 Safety management goals and objectives

15.4 Safety management policies

15.5 The role of consultation and cross-functional teams

15.6 Conclusion

 

Chapter 16: Quantitative methods and safety data analysis

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Defining data analysis

16.3 Defining quantitative data analysis

16.4 Safety data and decision making

16.5 Advantages of using Quantitative Methods

16.6 The research process

16.7 Gathering data

16.8 Data analysis

16.9 Analysing data ethically

16.10 Types of quantitative techniques

16.11 Pitfalls of data analysis

16.12 Conclusion

Analysis of Safety Incidents draws together the work and expertise of four authors experienced in the field of safety management. It guides readers through the theory of safety management with practical examples and applications as well as a series of self-assessment questions that test the readers’ understanding. Its content is of relevance to safety professionals, managers, business owners and students.

Some of the topics discussed in Analysis of Safety Incidents include:

·         Safety management

·         Safety incident investigation and reporting

·         Accident causation theories and loss

·         Safety and unsafety – challenging current views on safety hazards

·         Real safety hazards and the characteristics of safety hazards

·         Safety in a situational context, and humans as safety hazards

·         Safety as a science

·         Safety risk and its origins

·         Legal requirements

·         The role of cross-functional teams

·         Evaluating safety risks

·         Establishing a safety culture

 

·         Quantitative methods and safety data analysis

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