Genocide on Settler Frontiers (WebPDF)

When Hunter-gatherers and Commercial Stock Farmers Clash


Available
  • Format: eBook
  • ISBN: 9781775821533
  • Extent: 360 pages
  • Published:
  • Category: Scholarly

R472.00



In September 2012, UNESCO held its first ever consultation with member states on the subject of Holocaust and genocide education, recognising the importance of teaching the history of genocide. The aim was to find approaches to raise awareness about the recurrence of mass atrocities and genocide in different environments.

It is in this context that Mohamed Adhikari has put together this title, giving perspective to historical European overseas conquests which included many instances of the extermination of indigenous peoples. In cases where invading commercial stock farmers clashed with hunter-gatherers – in southern Africa, Australia and the Americas - the conflict was particularly destructive, often resulting in a degree of dispossession and slaughter that destroyed the ability of these societies to reproduce themselves biologically or culturally. The question of whether this form of colonial conflict was inherently genocidal has not in any systematic way been addressed by scholars until now.

Through chapters written by leading academics, this volume explores the nature of conflict between hunter-gatherers and market-oriented stock farmers in geographically and historically diverse instances, using a wide range of theoretical approaches and comparative studies, which also consider exceptions to the pattern of extermination.

INTRODUCTION  
Invariably genocide? The exterminatory dynamic behind commercial stock farmer invasions - Mohamed Adhikari (University of Cape Town)

PART ONE: SOUTHERN AFRICA
Chapter 1    ‘The Bushman is a wild animal to be shot at sight’: Annihilation of the Cape Colony’s foraging societies in the 18th and 19th centuries - Mohamed Adhikari (University of Cape Town)

Chapter 2    ‘Like a wild beast he can be got for the catching’: Child forced labour and the ‘taming’ of the San in the Cape Colony’s Northern Frontier Zone, 1790-1840 - Jared McDonald (University of London)

Chapter 3    ‘We exterminated them and Dr Philip gave the country’: The Griqua people and the elimination of the San from South Africa’s Transorangia Region – Edward Cavanagh (University of Ottawa)

Chapter 4  Vogelfrei and Besitzlos, with no concept of property: Divergent settler responses to Bushmen and Damara in German South West Africa – Robert Gordon
(University of Vermont)

Chapter 5    Racial paternalism, not genocide: The Case of the Ghanzi Bushmen (San)          of Colonial Botswana - Mathias Guenther (Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada)

Chapter 6  The destruction of hunter-gatherers on the pastoralist frontier: The Cape and Australia Compared - Nigel Penn (University of Cape Town)

PART TWO: AUSTRALIA
Chapter 7    ‘No right to the land’: The role of the wool industry in the destruction of aboriginal societies in Tasmania 1820-1835 and Victoria 1835-51 -  Lyndall Ryan (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Chapter 8    Indigenous possession and pastoral employment in Western Australia in the 1880s: Implications for understanding colonial forms of genocide - Ann Curthoys (University of Sydney)

PART THREE: NORTH AMERICA
Chapter 9    ‘A fierce and irresistible cavalry’: Pastoralists, settlers and hunters on the American Plains frontier – Tony Barta (La Trobe University)

Chapter 10    Dispossession, ecocide, genocide: Cattle ranching and agriculture in the destruction of hunting cultures on the Canadian Prairie - Sidney Harring (City University of New York)

Chapter 11  Conclusion: Seeing receding hunter-gatherers and advancing commercial pastoralists: ‘Nomadisation’, transfer, genocide – Lorenzo Veracini (Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne)

Academics and students in the fields of genocide studies, European colonialism, indigenous societies, as well as of the various national and regional histories involved. Interested lay readers will find these studies accessible and informative.

This product does not have any reviews yet - be the first to write one.

In September 2012, UNESCO held its first ever consultation with member states on the subject of Holocaust and genocide education, recognising the importance of teaching the history of genocide. The aim was to find approaches to raise awareness about the recurrence of mass atrocities and genocide in different environments.

It is in this context that Mohamed Adhikari has put together this title, giving perspective to historical European overseas conquests which included many instances of the extermination of indigenous peoples. In cases where invading commercial stock farmers clashed with hunter-gatherers – in southern Africa, Australia and the Americas - the conflict was particularly destructive, often resulting in a degree of dispossession and slaughter that destroyed the ability of these societies to reproduce themselves biologically or culturally. The question of whether this form of colonial conflict was inherently genocidal has not in any systematic way been addressed by scholars until now.

Through chapters written by leading academics, this volume explores the nature of conflict between hunter-gatherers and market-oriented stock farmers in geographically and historically diverse instances, using a wide range of theoretical approaches and comparative studies, which also consider exceptions to the pattern of extermination.

INTRODUCTION  
Invariably genocide? The exterminatory dynamic behind commercial stock farmer invasions - Mohamed Adhikari (University of Cape Town)

PART ONE: SOUTHERN AFRICA
Chapter 1    ‘The Bushman is a wild animal to be shot at sight’: Annihilation of the Cape Colony’s foraging societies in the 18th and 19th centuries - Mohamed Adhikari (University of Cape Town)

Chapter 2    ‘Like a wild beast he can be got for the catching’: Child forced labour and the ‘taming’ of the San in the Cape Colony’s Northern Frontier Zone, 1790-1840 - Jared McDonald (University of London)

Chapter 3    ‘We exterminated them and Dr Philip gave the country’: The Griqua people and the elimination of the San from South Africa’s Transorangia Region – Edward Cavanagh (University of Ottawa)

Chapter 4  Vogelfrei and Besitzlos, with no concept of property: Divergent settler responses to Bushmen and Damara in German South West Africa – Robert Gordon
(University of Vermont)

Chapter 5    Racial paternalism, not genocide: The Case of the Ghanzi Bushmen (San)          of Colonial Botswana - Mathias Guenther (Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada)

Chapter 6  The destruction of hunter-gatherers on the pastoralist frontier: The Cape and Australia Compared - Nigel Penn (University of Cape Town)

PART TWO: AUSTRALIA
Chapter 7    ‘No right to the land’: The role of the wool industry in the destruction of aboriginal societies in Tasmania 1820-1835 and Victoria 1835-51 -  Lyndall Ryan (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Chapter 8    Indigenous possession and pastoral employment in Western Australia in the 1880s: Implications for understanding colonial forms of genocide - Ann Curthoys (University of Sydney)

PART THREE: NORTH AMERICA
Chapter 9    ‘A fierce and irresistible cavalry’: Pastoralists, settlers and hunters on the American Plains frontier – Tony Barta (La Trobe University)

Chapter 10    Dispossession, ecocide, genocide: Cattle ranching and agriculture in the destruction of hunting cultures on the Canadian Prairie - Sidney Harring (City University of New York)

Chapter 11  Conclusion: Seeing receding hunter-gatherers and advancing commercial pastoralists: ‘Nomadisation’, transfer, genocide – Lorenzo Veracini (Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne)

Academics and students in the fields of genocide studies, European colonialism, indigenous societies, as well as of the various national and regional histories involved. Interested lay readers will find these studies accessible and informative.

This product does not have any reviews yet - be the first to write one.