Flawed Freedom, A

Rethinking Southern African Liberation

Product Attributes

  • Soft Cover
  • 9781775820789
  • 208
  • 2014

2014

R 290.00

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About this Publication:

Twenty years on from the fall of apartheid, veteran analyst and struggle activist John S. Saul examines the liberation struggle in southern Africa. He places it in a regional and global context and looks at how initial optimism and hope has given way to a sense of crisis and dysfunction, exemplified by soaring levels of inequality and violence.

With chapters on South Africa, Tanzania and Mozambique, Saul examines the reality of southern Africa’s post-'liberation' plight. He argues that globalisation is fostering in Africa a limited brand of development that offers wealth and power to the fortunate few and a form of recolonisation to the poorer majority. Saul discusses the ongoing 'rebellion of the poor', including the recent Marikana massacre, that continues to shake the region and may signal the possibility of a new and more hopeful future. He suggests that a second southern African liberation struggle is entirely possible in the future.

The book contains a tribute to Ruth First, revolutionary and social scientist, whose tragic end occurred down the hall from Saul’s office at the University of Eduardo Mondlane in Maputo; and a salute to Nelson Mandela.

Contents Include:

Introduction: “Globalization Made Me Do It” vs. “The Struggle Continues”
1. The Failure of Southern African Liberation?
2. Tanzania Fifty Years On (1961–2011): Rethinking Ujamaa, Nyerere and Socialism in Africa
3. Mozambique – not Then but Now
4. On Taming a Revolution: The South African Case
5. The New Terms of Resistance: Proletariat, Precariat and the Present African Prospect
6. Conclusions: The Struggle Really Does Continue in Southern Africa
Appendix: “More Comfortably Without Her?” Ruth First as Writer and Activist
Index

Of Interest and Benefit to:

Historians, sociologists, political scientists, students of Development Studies and African Studies, and anyone with an interest in African politics more generally.